June 20, 2019, 09:28:50 PM

Shoutbox

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  • Steve Elliott:
  • The place needs your ramblings ;)
  • June 04, 2019, 08:48:24 PM
  • Dabz:
  • :) Cheers Mr E! ;)
  • June 04, 2019, 08:47:22 PM
  • Steve Elliott:
  • Welcome back :)
  • June 04, 2019, 07:26:02 PM
  • Dabz:
  • *Waves at Steve* Under the radar, having a clear out and doing different things! ;)
  • June 04, 2019, 09:39:15 AM
  • therevills:
  • DABZ!!! Hows it gonna mate!?! Where have you been hiding??
  • June 04, 2019, 06:29:06 AM
  • Dabz:
  • from the front, which I'm presuming is the front... It looks like a cheese grater: [link]
  • June 04, 2019, 05:09:16 AM
  • markcwm:
  • I have to say, after the loss of Steve Jobs, Apple have been heading downhill, this mac pro is ugly, I wouldn't buy it for 10%.
  • June 04, 2019, 03:45:39 AM
  • therevills:
  • So new iPadOS, another target to develop for or compatible with iOS?
  • June 04, 2019, 03:33:27 AM
  • Qube:
  • Yeah but you can upgrade components and that explains the price tag :P
  • June 04, 2019, 01:38:05 AM
  • Dabz:
  • New Mac Pro, a snip at £4700, does not include screen or stand! Cheap as out, I'll take 10 /sarcasm
  • June 03, 2019, 10:10:27 PM
  • Yellownakji:
  • I can see your point for this, and i appreciate the example.  I would assume this is so simply because blue is much darker than green and thus messes with the eye.
  • June 02, 2019, 07:39:26 PM
  • Kryzon:
  • Green [0 255 0] and blue [0 0 255] have the same HSL saturation and lightness, but they appear to have different brightnesses. Lch gives different L values for each.
  • June 02, 2019, 12:47:20 PM
  • Kryzon:
  • Sorry, by "linear" Iy meant "perceptually linear". If you take two HSL colors, even if they have the same L (Lightness) value, they might appear to have different brightnesses because of how our eyes work. The CIE Lch space is perceptually uniform, meaning if two colors have the same L value they will appear to have the same brightness.
  • June 02, 2019, 12:43:08 PM
  • Yellownakji:
  • What is your definition of linear?  0 is red and 360 is red.. It's seamless to create a rainbow gradient by adding +1 to the hue every frame;  0 - 360 is "linear" to me.  It's optimal for software that allows it's users to customize..  just control the hue and change the lum as you please.. idiot proof design for even the most "cave man" of users.  That's why i picked it..  RGB is a pain.   the whole thing is a mess in design.
  • June 02, 2019, 03:36:37 AM
  • Kryzon:
  • The problem is that HSV / HSL don't vary colors in a linear way. Take a look at LCH, the polar version of the LAB space, it's much more natural. Conversion is a bit more expensive, RGB -> XYZ -> LAB/LCH
  • June 02, 2019, 01:06:33 AM
  • Yellownakji:
  • and yes, i'm also heavily using it for blending, as well.
  • June 01, 2019, 08:38:41 PM
  • Yellownakji:
  • I wrote my own converter for RGB to HSV; I'm using it because RGB's design is terrible in my opinion.  It's much preferable to split color from luminance (value).  I'm using it in a personal game i'm writing as well as my other projects; It's much simpler for the end user to move HSV values for custom colors, then RGB.  It is also more efficient, in my work flow, because the hue spectrum is more logical then 'mixing' like with RGB.  Conversion is extremely light, so there is no trade off.
  • June 01, 2019, 08:38:15 PM
  • Derron:
  • I avoid HSV/HSL/CMYK as much as possible, am so used to RGB on computer displays. Only am using it to manipulate saturation/brightness of RGB colors.
  • June 01, 2019, 10:49:00 AM
  • Qube:
  • Ahh, that's me just assuming it's for some fancy game blending effects ;D
  • May 31, 2019, 08:08:34 PM
  • markcwm:
  • I don't think he is using it for games, it's probably for some kind of image app.
  • May 31, 2019, 08:01:29 PM
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