August 25, 2019, 12:23:54 AM

Author Topic: Demo Scene - old skool graphics  (Read 140 times)

Offline Derron

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Demo Scene - old skool graphics
« on: August 12, 2019, 08:09:23 PM »
As the two dudes in the demo-scene-raspi-thread thought it is best to purge my post there I create a new thread for it.

First video is containing some different "hardware limited" graphics - many of them show the "steps" from begin + finish of an image.
(you might skip the first minutes of the "intro").



That cute mushroom+gnome image of the first video has its own timelapse-video. Seems they know their grafx2/dpaint-thing well.


As you see: most of the time it does not matter what tool you need as long as you have enough fantasy in your mind and time to push yourself to your (pixel) limits.



bye
Ron

Offline Kryzon

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Re: Demo Scene - old skool graphics
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2019, 12:01:04 AM »
I'd bet they also have some traditional painting experience, a lot of the same visual-art principles apply: sketching, color mixing, lighting, composition/staging etc.

Offline Derron

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Re: Demo Scene - old skool graphics
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2019, 10:12:59 AM »
Thought so about this too (the blue lines) but it is always mesmerizing how seemingly "easy" these timelapse-creators draw their stuff within minutes. How they master their tools (shortcuts and the knowledge of what features they can use to reach certain results).

bye
Ron

Offline Kryzon

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Re: Demo Scene - old skool graphics
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2019, 02:18:42 PM »
I feel the same too, the time lapse makes it look so easy. 
Another cool thing to notice is that their first attempt at sketching or painting something isn't usually the one they settle with, you can see them slightly repainting an element (it morphs in shape while they're adjusting it). 

You can see it more clearly in here (like at 0:25), how the artist constantly uses the warp / free-deformation tools to correct their sketch while working:

Using warp in this way is kinda like 2D sculpting: you start with a sketch that's the best you can do, but then you manipulate/sculpt it until you get it "perfect".

Offline Derron

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Re: Demo Scene - old skool graphics
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2019, 04:01:15 PM »
In Photoshop I always avoided that "free transform" thing as it blurred former crisp lines. Maybe todays Photoshop incarnations are more "smart" and keep the original and apply transformation on it (in PS1 there were no "smart objects").
With boom studio or other "cartoon drawing"-specialized tools you get way more cool things to correct overdrawing and the likes. Maybe you know SolidWorks (or other Cad tools) they have "Smart Truncate" at which you strike over a undesired line and it removes it till the next intersection. So if you draw 2 circles crossing each you can easily remove the "inner lines" and keep the pure Outline.

This is so helpful stuff when doing freehand drawing with your digitizer / graphics tablet.

Yet I am always envy how easily they seem to achieve smooth curved lines, perectly fitting eyebrow strokes, ...
Regardless of the required skills I also so often have my jaw dropped to the ground of what some concept artists can come up with - this is the part which requires (imho) the most fantasy.


bye
Ron