June 27, 2019, 12:10:39 AM

Author Topic: Amazing Mazes  (Read 529 times)

Offline 3DzForMe

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Amazing Mazes
« on: October 23, 2018, 11:15:49 AM »
Didn't get too far with my entry, this was my prototype splash screen, can't beat a bit of paper prototyping ;)

Offline RemiD

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Re: Amazing Mazes
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2018, 05:43:12 PM »
this gave me an idea : you could definitely code some procedures to convert a "drawing" (with one color for each shape (corridor)) in a maze.

the advantage to do that is the automatic creation of the environment and also for pathfinding...
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Offline Derron

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Re: Amazing Mazes
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2018, 06:50:57 PM »
@ RemiD

I generate my maze this way already. Using ASCII-chars to mark elements (of course this only works for a base layer then). Afterwards the real maze-generator transforms "wall" into "wall vertical", "3 side corner", and so on (depending on the neighbours).

bye
Ron

Offline 3DzForMe

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Re: Amazing Mazes
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2018, 04:02:15 PM »
You both got me thinking about how my paper prototype would transpose into a height mapped terrain on a 3d space invaders thing with deformable terrain... You can just about make out the bombed G and I've hilighted how the lines on the page transform into Valleys. Blitz 3D still rocks  8)

The terrain texture is nothing to clever.... Loads of Capital A s.

@Derron, you're method of creating walls from chars is ingenious.

Offline BasicBoy

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Re: Amazing Mazes
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2018, 04:27:40 PM »
I generate my maze this way already. Using ASCII-chars to mark elements (of course this only works for a base layer then). Afterwards the real maze-generator transforms "wall" into "wall vertical", "3 side corner", and so on (depending on the neighbours).

Same here, pretty much.

For instance, the Maizie Bones 'Treasure Tower' mini-game defines the maze as follows (the '&' denotes hex values):




For the 'Amazeballs' mini-game I drew the map in Adobe Photoshop Elements:



(Probably too small to see): the blue dots are coins, the bright green dots are baddies, dark cyan ones are 'high-value' stars, and the bright cyan one (near bottom-left corner) is the player.

I couldn't face having to write yet another map editor! (And, of course, I was running out of time)


David.
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Offline 3DzForMe

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Re: Amazing Mazes
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2018, 04:33:40 PM »
David,

Awesome stuff, the mini games really raised a smile, the mini tower one was reminiscent of an Amiga game a while back, great work.

Mark.

Offline Matty

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Re: Amazing Mazes
« Reply #6 on: October 25, 2018, 06:21:45 AM »
My mazes are all generated procedurally....no human design except for the algorithm.

The algorithm is as follows:

Pick a cell - make a room of mxn cells, send out corridors for l steps from a few of the walls, create more rooms and repeat..with some randomness.

Then to add some noise....

Carve out cells at random where there is an adjacent cell to the 'current random target cell' which is also empty...this guarantees the maze has no isolated parts. Repeat this until a certain proportion of the map is empty cells.

Oh...and use a seed that can be set and remembered for later - so if you go into the same dungeon later on it is the same maze (although creatures might change)


Offline 3DzForMe

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Re: Amazing Mazes
« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2018, 04:03:06 PM »
Producing mazes from an algorithm is a great way to produce mazes, no human design required... Apart from your robust algorithm that is!