August 25, 2019, 09:12:06 AM

Author Topic: Languages used in the aMAZEing game comp (September 1st to October 14th 2018)  (Read 1530 times)

Offline Xerra

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As is the custom, I thought I'd start this thread up here so we can see what development system everyone who entered the most recent game competition used.

Rockman was written with Gamemaker Studio 2, along with a few other handy tools such as Snagit, Aseprite and BFXer.

Offline BasicBoy

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My entry 'Maizie Bones' was written in BBC Basic (98%), some x86 assembler code, and a tiny bit of C compiled into a DLL.

Offline Steve Elliott

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Thanks guys, appreciated.   :D

Some x86 assembler code, and a tiny bit of C compiled into a DLL for what exactly BasicBoy?

[Edit]
I'll thank here BasicBoy to save from derailing any more.  Interesting.   :)
Windows 10, 64-bit, 16Gb RAM, CPU Intel i5, 3.2 GHz, Nvidia GeForce GTX 1050 (2Gb).
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Linux Mint 19.1, 64-bit, 16Gb RAM, CPU Intel i5, 3.2 GHz, Nvidia GeForce GTX 1050 (2Gb).
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Offline Derron

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Maze Raider:
Programmed in: Godot 3.0.6, "GDScript" (not C#).
Graphics: Blender for modelling, texture painting, rigging and animating (and of course rendering ;-)), icons/symbols were done in my old Photoshop CS1
Audio: from the internet and edited (if needed and allowed) in Audacity


bye
Ron


Offline BasicBoy

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Thanks guys, appreciated.   :D

Some x86 assembler code, and a tiny bit of C compiled into a DLL for what exactly BasicBoy?

The assembler code was for 'fake-mapping' a bitmap image to a sphere (as used in the
'A Maze In Sphere' subgame) or a cylinder (as used in 'Treasure Tower' subgame).

BBC Basic (being an interpreted language) just isn't fast enough to do this at an acceptable speed.

Some C code was used for the 'Amazeballs' subgame for collision detection, and also to determine
which objects in the 3D world are currently visible in the player's viewport.  This could probably
have been done in Basic, but it needed to be fast and I didn't have time to devise any clever coding
tricks, so I just cobbled together some C code -- job done!

The x86 Asm code for 'Treasure Tower' is included below for the curious.


David.
--


Code: [Select]
      DEF FNTreasureTower_Asm
      LOCAL I%, lp, skip
      PRIVATE C%
      IF C% <> 0 THEN =C%
      DIM C% 127
      FOR I% = 0 TO 2 STEP 2
        P% = C%
        [OPT I%
        ; EAX = 754x384 source bitmap
        ; EBX = offsets data (480x384 bitmap)
        ; ECX = destination buffer (4*480x384)
        pushad
        xor edx, edx ; index
        .lp
        mov edi, [ebx + 4*edx] ; get offset
        test edi, edi
        jz skip
        mov esi, [eax + edi]   ; load pixel from 754x384 source bitmap
        mov [ecx + 4*edx], esi ; write to destination buffer
        .skip
        inc edx
        cmp edx, (480*384)
        jl lp
        popad
        ret
        ]
      NEXT I%
      = C%


Offline Holzchopf

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Crazy Dram was written in Cerberus X

Online Matty

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The young prince was written in javascript with a tiny amount of php for tracking some metrics.

Music was sourced from internet.

graphics were either produced in code or drawn by hand in paint.net.

Offline Qube

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TankMania was done in Unity / C#
Until the next time...

Offline GW

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Maze Escape uses Blitzmax NG.

I prototyped in both monkey and Bmax using different frameworks and libs looking to get a jump start.
Eventually I went with Bmax and make my own framework because I'm most productive in it. 
In hindsight I probably should have picked something I wasn't so familiar with (unity or monogame) to make it also more of a learning experience.   Although this is the first time I've done a lot of glsl shader programming.   
I composed all the songs myself using a tool written in blitzmax.

Offline therevills

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A Knight's Maze developed in Godot 3 using GScript, the graphics created in PyxelEdit and sounds created in sfxr.

Next one will be created in Monogame...

Offline Morpheus

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I also use Game Maker Studio 2, along with Adobe Fireworks, Affinity Designer, Swift 3D, Snagit, Camtasia and ViM.

Offline TomToad

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MineBlast was written using Monkey2. All graphics were done by me in Pyxel Edit except for the explosion which I grabbed from an asset pack I had purchased from TheGameCreators.com.  Sound effects were also from an asset pack from TheGameCreators.  Music is from www.soundimage.org by Eric Matyas.
------------------------------------------------
8 rabbits equals 1 rabbyte.

Offline round157

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Hi,

Summary:

1st place: Maizie Bones
              (BBC Basic(98%), x86 assembler code and C)

2nd place: Vanarchy
               (Blitz3D)

3rd place: Maze Raider
               (GDScript, Godot 3.0.6)

4th place: Young Prince
               (Javascript with a tiny amount of PHP)

4th place: Crazy Dram
               (Cerberus X)

5th place: Rockman
               (GameMaker Language, GameMaker Studio 2)

6th place: Rock-n-Roll
               (GameMaker Language, GameMaker Studio 2)

7th place: TankMania
               (C#, Unity)

8th place: Maze Escape
               (Blitzmax NG)

9th place: MineBlast
               (Monkey2)

9th place: A Knight's Maze
               (GDScript, Godot 3)

The ranking is according to the results of this competition:
https://www.syntaxbomb.com/index.php/topic,4989.0.html


Offline Qube

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Great to see a whole load of languages / engines in the competitions. It demonstrates it's not the language / engine but the actual game itself which shines through regardless of the method used.
Until the next time...

Offline round157

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Great to see a whole load of languages / engines in the competitions. It demonstrates it's not the language / engine but the actual game itself which shines through regardless of the method used.


Hi, all these languages and engines can also be used to make very high quality computer games, yes!

I think that this aMAZEing game competition is really very amazing. I hope that the next competition will also be very amazing.